National Film Award for Best Cinematography

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National Film Award for Best Cinematography
National award for contributions to Indian Cinema
Sponsored byDirectorate of Film Festivals
Formerly calledAward for excellence in Cinematography (1967–1976)
Reward(s)
  • Rajat Kamal (Silver Lotus)
  • 50,000 (US$700)
First awarded1967
Last awarded
  •  • 2017 (Cameraman)
  •  • 2012 (Laboratory Processing)
Most recent winner
Highlights
Total awarded
  •  • 68 (Cameraman)
  •  • 23 (Laboratory Processing)
First winner
  •  • Ramachandra (Colour)
  •  • M. N. Malhotra (Black-and-white)

The National Film Award for Best Cinematography is one of the National Film Awards presented annually by the Directorate of Film Festivals, the organisation set up by Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, India. It is one of several awards presented for feature films and awarded with Rajat Kamal (Silver Lotus).

The award was instituted in 1967, at 15th National Film Awards and awarded annually for films produced in the year across the country, in all Indian languages. Till 34th National Film Awards, awards were given for Black-and-white as well as Color motion picture film. Since 37th National Film Awards, Laboratory Processing are also awarded under the same category.

Winners[edit]

Award includes 'Rajat Kamal' (Silver Lotus) and cash prize. The only female who has won this award is Anjuli Shukla, who won the award for her debut film, Kutty Srank (2010). The most time winners are K. K. Mahajan and Santosh Sivan – 4 awards each for this category. Prasad Film Lab has been awarded eight times for the laboratory processing. Following are the award winners over the years:

*
Indicates Black-and-white feature film
List of award recipients, showing the year (award ceremony), film(s), language(s) and citation
Year Recipient(s) Laboratory Processing Film(s) Language(s) Citation Refs.
1967
(15th)
Ramachandra  – Bambai Raat Ki Bahon Mein Hindi  – [1]
M. N. Malhotra  – Hamraaz Hindi  –
1968
(16th)
Nariman Irani  – Saraswatichandra Hindi  – [2]
K. S. Prasad  – Thillana Mohanambal Tamil  –
1969
(17th)
K. K. Mahajan  – Sara Akash Hindi  – [3]
Marcus Bartley  – Shanti Nilayam Tamil  –
1970
(18th)
K. K. Mahajan  – Uski Roti Hindi  – [4]
Radhu Karmakar  – Mera Naam Joker Hindi  –
1971
(19th)
Nando Bhattacharya  – Anubhav Hindi  – [5]
Ramachandra  – Reshma Aur Shera Hindi  –
1972
(20th)
Mankada Ravi Varma  – Swayamvaram Malayalam  – [6]
K. K. Mahajan  – Maya Darpan Hindi  –
1973
(21st)
Apurba Kishore Bir  – 27 Down Hindi  – [7]
Soumendu Roy  – Ashani Sanket Bengali  –
1974
(22nd)
K. K. Mahajan  – Chorus Bengali  – [8]
Soumendu Roy  – Sonar Kella Bengali  –
1975
(23rd)
B. S. Lokanath  – Apoorva Raagangal Tamil  – [9]
Ishan Arya  – Muthyala Muggu Telugu  –
1976
(24th)
P. S. Nivas  – Mohiniyaattam Malayalam  – [10]
S. Ramachandra  – Rishya Shringa Kannada  –
1977
(25th)
Balu Mahendra  – Kokila Kannada
For smooth, crisp and immaculate camera work; for the clear, sensitive and discreet portrayal of beings in the first flush of youth; for seizing with a certain lyrical grace their romantic yearnings, their gay abandon, their zest and effervescence, their charming narcissism; for using the camera creatively to project their languid world of gossamer dreams out of which they are roused by the bitter harshness of reality.
[11]
Soumendu Roy  – Shatranj Ke Khilari Hindi
For capturing in meticulous detail the opulent splendor of the court of Wajid Ali Shah; for using color with discrimination and taste to evoke the distinctive decadent flavour of the period and to provide psychological insights into the characters; for projecting the action through a framework of shifting perspectives, thereby providing a movable feast for the eyes, for establishing by pointed contrast the somber hues and subdued functionalism of the environment of General Outram, emphasising by such means the furtive manoeuvring for power; for using the camera to create a visual tapestry, rich in the clash of conflicting events, ideologies and responsibilities.
1978
(26th)
Shaji N. Karun  – Thampu Malayalam
For using the camera as a silent witness to the ironies of life. The reaction shots of circus audience taken unawares are in the best tradition of cinema-verite camera style.
[12]
Govind Nihalani  – Junoon Hindi
For eloquent camera work which is equally effective both in romantic passages and battle sequences. The camera faultlessly brings out all the colour hues in various locations and differing light conditions.
1979
(27th)
Kamal Nayak  – Neem Annapurna Bengali  – [13]
Rajan Kinagi  – Shodh Hindi  –
1980
(28th)
Sivan  – Yagam Malayalam
For depicting the grim and tense mood of the film, admirably depicting mellowed moments in the film with charm.
[14]
Ashok Kumar  – Nenjathai Killathe Tamil
For brilliantly creating salient features of each character with the help of superb camera control and effective use of lighting and for significantly contributing to the mood of the film.
1981
(29th)
Shripati R. Bhat  – Mooru Darigalu Kannada
For projecting the mood of the film in a vivid manner.
[15]
Ashok Mehta  – 36 Chowringhee Lane English
For the technical excellence, for highlighting the tonality, texture and nuances of the story and for an outstanding work as a cameraman.
1982
(30th)
Balu Mahendra  – Moondram Pirai Tamil
For the brilliant use of vivid imagery to create variety of moods.
[16]
1983
(31st)
B. Bindhani  – Neeraba Jhada Oriya
For recording the stark realities of rural life in austere images.
[17]
Raj Shekhar
Madhu Ambat  – Adi Shankaracharya Sanskrit
For succeeding in capturing visually the spirit of the theme.
1984
(32nd)
Jehangir Choudhary  – Holi Hindi  – [18]
1985
(33rd)
Subrata Mitra  – New Delhi Times Hindi
For inspired camera work which brings out the delicate nuances of light and shade resulting in a strong visual presentation.
[19]
1986
(34th)
Venu  – Namukku Parkkan Munthiri Thoppukal Malayalam
For the lyrical and brilliant visual presentation.
[20]
Amma Ariyan
For his powerful and disturbing black and white photography.
1987
(35th)
P. C. Sreeram  – Nayakan Tamil
For the precise interpretation in lighting and camera operation adding a very vital dimension to the narrative.
[21]
1988
(36th)
Apurba Kishore Bir  – Daasi Telugu
For high technical excellence and creative participation in evolving the basic statement.
[22]
1989
(37th)
Virendra Saini Adlabs Salim Langde Pe Mat Ro Hindi
For the high technical skills shown in evoking the special ethos of the film.
[23]
1990
(38th)
Santosh Sivan Vijay Colour Lab Perumthachan Malayalam
For heightening the mood of the film with the highest visual standards.
[24]
1991
(39th)
Apurba Kishore Bir Prasad Film Lab Aadi Mimansa Oriya
For achieving high degree of accomplishment in painting the film with light, imparting a sensuous quality to the texture and feel of the film.
[25]
1992
(40th)
Venu Prasad Film Lab Miss Beatty's Children English
For his masterely, unobtrusive and technically excellent camera work.
[26]
1993
(41st)
Venu Prasad Film Lab Ponthan Mada Malayalam
For the masterly use of the camera, in order to capture the feel of the background, setting, atmosphere of the subject and making use of striking visuals to communicate the theme.
[27]
1994
(42nd)
K. V. Anand Gemini Color Lab Thenmavin Kombath Malayalam
In recognition of the outstanding cinematography executed with sincerity, imagination and flexibility. Fluid camera movements, praise compositions, and use of light are the highlights of this visual experience.
[28]
1995
(43rd)
Santosh Sivan Gemini Color Lab Kaalapani Malayalam
For bringing out the flavour and authenticity of a period with a remarkable use of lights, shades and colours.
[29]
1996
(44th)
Mrinal Kanti Das Prasad Film Lab Adajya Assamese
For his versatile, imaginative and superb combinations and mood lighting.
[30]
Rag Birag
1997
(45th)
Santosh Sivan Prasad Film Lab Iruvar Tamil
For maintaining a consistent style and pattern that does justice to the period and scale that the narrative deals with.
[31]
1998
(46th)
Santosh Sivan Gemini Color Lab Dil Se.. Hindi
His camera travels across spectacular landscapes and architecture and through bustling humanity with great seductive charm, colours and moods are created with equal ease in a film which sets a high standard of cinematic perfection.
[32]
1999
(47th)
Anil Mehta Adlabs Hum Dil De Chuke Sanam Hindi
For a wide range of tonal variations achieved by the cinematographer to express the changing moods of this musical in a given space and time.
[33]
2000
(48th)
Ashok Mehta Prasad Film Lab Moksha Hindi
For providing wide range of tonal variation and outstanding compositions to cater to the changing moods of the film's narrative.
[34]
2001
(49th)
Ramachandra Halkare Prasad Film Lab Dweepa Kannada
For his excellent camerawork that captures the agrarian milieu with strong visual metaphors. His work stands out for its deft handling of the situation, social vignettes and characters.
[35]
2002
(50th)
Abhik Mukhopadhyay Rainbow Color Lab Patalghar Bengali
For creating the distinctive and elegant visual ambience of the film that is excellently in tune with the mood of the story.
[36]
2003
(51st)
Abhik Mukhopadhyay Rainbow Color Lab Bhalo Theko Bengali
For enriching the narrative with tranquility and beauty.
[37]
2004
(52nd)
Mahesh Aney Adlabs Swades Hindi
For his lens that captures the rural Indian landscape with reality and harshness.
[38]
2005
(53rd)
Madhu Ambat Prasad Film Lab Sringaram Tamil
For the technical brilliance which is evident in the framing, lighting and execution throughout the film.
[39]
2006
(54th)
Gautam Ghose Rainbow Colour Lab Yatra Hindi
For creating evocative moods and capturing the nuances of a feudal system changing to modern times.
[40]
2007
(55th)
Shanker Raman Deluxe Laboratories Inc. Frozen Hindi
For the artistic and technical excellence of cinematography revealed through superb reproduction of tonalities and stark compositions, maintaining the texture on high altitude.
[41]
2008
(56th)
Abhik Mukhopadhyay Filmlab Antaheen Bengali
For the poetically captured visuals with inspired use of light and shades to enhanced the mood of the film.
[42]
2009
(57th)
Anjuli Shukla Adlabs Kutty Srank Malayalam
For the breathtaking sweep that captures the magical mystery of a multilayered narrative.
[43]
2010
(58th)
Madhu Ambat  – Adaminte Makan Abu Malayalam
For the visual poetry that augments and reinforces the concern of the narrative and for unfolding the infinite vistas of nascent digital technology in the visual medium.
[44]
2011
(59th)
Satya Rai Nagpaul Reliance MediaWorks Anhe Ghore Da Daan Punjabi
For skilfully blending the narrative and the moving image to describe the desolate fields of Punjab making its painful transition towards a dehumanised urban world. He provides a human feel to the textures of this once bountiful landscape with some brilliant lighting and compositional unity. The minimalism employed opens up a rich tapestry of rural faces, landscapes and its animals in a way that allows the viewer to virtually inhabit these spaces.
[45]
2012
(60th)
Sudheer Palsane Prasad Studios Ko:Yad Mishing
The unexplored charm of North-East India through different seasons is all the more alluring in the eyes of this Cinematographer.
[46]
2013
(61st)
Rajeev Ravi  – Liar's Dice Hindi
For capturing life from the picturesque snow-laden mountains through a strenuous bus journey, to the crowded and dingy streets of Delhi with a rare fluidity.
[47]
2014
(62nd)
Sudeep Chatterjee  – Chotushkone Bengali
For exhibiting a wide spectrum of space and time while effortlessly knitting the emotional fabric of the film.
[48]
2015
(63rd)
Sudeep Chatterjee  – Bajirao Mastani Hindi
For bringing about an outstanding visual dynamics, depicting the grand interiors of palaces and vast landscapes with an artistic interplay of light & shadows.
[49]
2016
(64th)
Tirru  – 24 Tamil
For understating the basic requirements of popular ‘movie watching experience’ and enhancing it manifold.
[50]
2017
(65th)
Nikhil S. Praveen  – Bhayanakam Malayalam

References[edit]

  1. ^ "15th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 21 September 2011.
  2. ^ "16th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 22 September 2011.
  3. ^ "17th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 26 September 2011.
  4. ^ "18th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 26 September 2011.
  5. ^ "19th National Film Awards". Retrieved 10 July 2012.
  6. ^ "20th National Film Awards". International Film Festival of India. Retrieved 26 September 2011.
  7. ^ "21st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 29 September 2011.
  8. ^ "22nd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 1 October 2011.
  9. ^ "23rd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 4 October 2011.
  10. ^ "24th National Film Awards". Retrieved 10 July 2012.
  11. ^ "25th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 4 October 2011.
  12. ^ "26th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 4 October 2011.
  13. ^ "27th National Film Awards". Retrieved 10 July 2012.
  14. ^ "28th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 4 October 2011.
  15. ^ "29th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 4 October 2011.
  16. ^ "30th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 4 October 2011.
  17. ^ "31st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 9 December 2011.
  18. ^ "32nd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 6 January 2012.
  19. ^ "33rd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 7 January 2012.
  20. ^ "34th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 7 January 2012.
  21. ^ "35th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 9 January 2012.
  22. ^ "36th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 9 January 2012.
  23. ^ "37th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 29 January 2012.
  24. ^ "38th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 9 January 2012.
  25. ^ "39th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 27 February 2012.
  26. ^ "40th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 2 March 2012.
  27. ^ "41st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  28. ^ "42nd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 5 March 2012.
  29. ^ "43rd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 6 March 2012.
  30. ^ "44th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 9 January 2012.
  31. ^ "45th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 11 March 2012.
  32. ^ "46th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 12 March 2012.
  33. ^ "47th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 13 March 2012.
  34. ^ "48th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 13 March 2012.
  35. ^ "49th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 14 March 2012.
  36. ^ "50th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 14 March 2012.
  37. ^ "51st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 15 March 2012.
  38. ^ "52nd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 28 January 2012.
  39. ^ "53rd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 19 March 2012.
  40. ^ "54th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 24 March 2012.
  41. ^ "55th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 26 March 2012.
  42. ^ "56th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 27 March 2012.
  43. ^ "57th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 28 March 2012.
  44. ^ "58th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 29 March 2012.
  45. ^ "59th National Film Awards for the Year 2011 Announced". Press Information Bureau (PIB), India. Retrieved 7 March 2012.
  46. ^ "60th National Film Awards Announced" (PDF) (Press release). Press Information Bureau (PIB), India. Retrieved May 2, 2013.
  47. ^ "61st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. 16 April 2014. Archived from the original (PDF) on 16 April 2014. Retrieved 16 April 2014.
  48. ^ "62nd National Film Awards" (PDF) (Press release). Directorate of Film Festivals. 24 March 2015. Retrieved 24 March 2015.
  49. ^ "63rd National Film Awards" (PDF) (Press release). Directorate of Film Festivals. 28 March 2016. Retrieved 28 March 2016.
  50. ^ "64th National Film Awards" (PDF) (Press release). Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 6 June 2017. Retrieved 7 April 2017.

External links[edit]