Libertarian Party of California

Libertarian Party of California
AbbreviationLPC
ChairmanMimi Robson
Founded1971; 49 years ago (1971)
Headquarters770 L Street #950
Sacramento, CA 95814
IdeologyLibertarianism[1]
Non-interventionism[2]
Fiscal conservatism[3]
Economic liberalism[3]
Cultural liberalism[3]
Laissez-faire[3]
Senate
0 / 40
House of Representatives
0 / 80
U.S. Senate
0 / 2
U.S. House of Representatives
0 / 4
Statewide Executive Offices1
0 / 8
Elected officials14 (2016 Est.)[4]
Website
ca.lp.org

1California Department of Education is a nonpartisan state executive position.

The Libertarian Party of California (LPC) is the California affiliate of the national Libertarian Party (LP). The party chairwoman is Mimi Robson, and is based in Sacramento, California, in Sacramento County.[5] As of 2016 Libertarians represent approximately 0.74% of the state's registered voters.[6]

History[edit]

In 1972 the party considered suing county clerks in Placer and Butte counties for refusing to allow voters to register as Libertarians.[7] In 1978 Ed Clark, who had been the affiliate's chairman from 1973 to 1974 and later the national presidential candidate in 1980, ran as an independent for governor of California to gain party recognition and received over five percent.[8] However, the Secretary of State ruled that the two percent requirement was for retaining party recognition and not gaining party recognition and that since Clark had ran as an independent and not a Libertarian it would not count either way.[9] The party filed a lawsuit against the decision, but it was first dismissed then ruled against on appeal. The Libertarian Party of California has hosted the Libertarian National Convention in 1977, 1979, 1980, and in 2000.

Current officials[edit]

Former officials[edit]

  • Calimesa City councilor Mayor and Jeff Hewitt (2011-2015)(2015-2018)[24]
  • Bellflower city coucilor and mayor Art Olivier (1994-1997)(1998-1999)

Electoral performance[edit]

Year Presidential nominee Votes Change
1972 John Hospers (write-in) 980 (0.05%) Steady
1976 Roger MacBride 56,388 (0.72) Increase 0.71%
1980 Ed Clark 148,434 (1.73%) Increase 1.01%
1984 David Bergland 49,951 (0.53%) Decrease 1.20%
1988 Ron Paul 70,105 (0.71%) Increase 0.18%
1992 Andre Marrou 48,139 (0.43%) Decrease 0.28%
1996 Harry Browne 73,600 (0.73%) Increase 0.30%
2000 Harry Browne 45,520 (0.42%) Decrease 0.31%
2004 Michael Badnarik 50,165 (0.40%) Decrease 0.02%
2008 Bob Barr 67,582 (0.50%) Increase 0.10%
2012 Gary Johnson 143,221 (1.10%) Increase 0.60%
2016 Gary Johnson 478,500 (3.37%) Increase 2.27%

Senate Class I[edit]

Year Senate nominee Votes Change
1982 Joseph Fuhrig 107,720 (1.38%) Steady
1988 Jack Dean 79,997 (0.82%) Decrease 0.56%
1992 Richard Benjamin Boddie 247,799 (2.30%) Increase 1.48%
1994 Richard Benjamin Boddie 179,100 (2.10%) Decrease 0.20%
2000 Gail Lightfoot 187,718 (1.77%) Decrease 0.33%
2006 Michael S. Metti 133,851 (1.57%) Decrease 0.20%
2012 Gail Lightfoot 101,648 (2.09%) Increase 0.52%
2018 Derrick Michael Reid 59,999 (0.90%) Decrease 1.19%

Senate Class III[edit]

Year Senate nominee Votes Change
1980 David Bergland 202,481 (2.43%) Steady
1986 Breck McKinley 66,261 (0.90%) Decrease 1.53%
1992 June R. Genis 235,919 (2.18%) Increase 1.28%
1998 Ted Brown 93,926 (1.13%) Increase 1.05%
2004 James P. Gray 216,522 (1.80%) Increase 0.67%
2010 Gail Lightfoot 175,235 (1.75%) Decrease 0.05%
2016 Gail Lightfoot
Mark Matthew Herd
141,105 (1.88%)[a] Decrease 0.13%

Gubernatorial[edit]

Year Gubernatorial nominee Votes Change
1978 Ed Clark[b] 377,960 (5.46%) Decrease 0.58%
1982 Dan P. Dougherty 81,076 (1.03%) Decrease 4.43%
1986 Joseph Fuhrig 52,628 (0.71%) Decrease 0.32%
1990 Dennis Thompson 145,628 (1.89%) Increase 1.18%
1994 Richard Rider 149,281 (1.72%) Decrease 0.17%
1998 Steve Kubby 73,845 (0.88%) Decrease 0.84%
2002 Gary David Copeland 161,203 (2.16%) Increase 1.28%
2003 Ned Roscoe
Ken Hamidi
John Hickey
5,887 (0.06%)[c] Decrease 2.10%
2006 Art Olivier 114,329 (1.32%) Increase 1.26%
2010 Dale Ogden 150,898 (1.49%) Increase 0.17%
2014 None None Decrease 1.49%
2018 Zoltan Istvan
Nickolas Wildstar
26,028 (0.38%)[d] Increase 0.38%

Lieutenant Gubernatorial[edit]

Year Lieutenant nominee Votes Change
1994 Bob New 180,896 (2.13%) Steady
1998 Thomas Tryon 109,888 (1.35%) Decrease 0.78%
2002 Pat Wright 104,920 (1.44%) Increase 0.09%
2006 Lynnette Shaw 142,851 (1.67%) Increase 0.23%
2010 Pamela Brown 574,640 (5.86%) Increase 4.19%
2014 None None Decrease 5.86%
2018 Tim Ferreira 99,949 (1.53%) Increase 1.53%

Attorney General[edit]

Year Attorney General nominee Votes Change
1994 Richard N. Burns 274,335 (3.33%) Steady
1998 Joseph S. Farina 149,430 (1.87%) Decrease 1.46%
2002 Ed Kuwatch 127,152 (1.76%) Decrease 0.11%
2006 Kenneth Weissman 177,469 (2.10%) Increase 0.34%
2010 Timothy J. Hannan 246,583 (2.56%) Increase 0.46%
2014 Jonathan Jaech 99,056 (2.42%) Decrease 0.14%
2018 None None Decrease 2.42%

Secretary of State[edit]

Year Secretary of State nominee Votes Change
1994 Peggy Christensen 248,748 (3.02%) Steady
1998 Gail Lightfoot 216,853 (2.69%) Decrease 0.33%
2002 Gail Lightfoot 204,527 (2.82%) Decrease 0.13%
2006 Gail Lightfoot 171,393 (2.04%) Decrease 0.78%
2010 Christina Tobin 157,974 (2.21%) Increase 0.17%
2014 None None Decrease 2.21%
2018 Gail Lightfoot 155,879 (2.36%) Increase 2.36%

State Treasurer[edit]

Year State Treasurer nominee Votes Change
1994 John Petersen 335,452 (4.09%) Steady
1998 John Petersen 183,436 (2.32%) Decrease 1.77%
2002 Marian Smithson 168,401 (2.34%) Increase 0.02%
2006 Marian Smithson 334,056 (4.01%) Increase 1.67%
2010 Edward Teyssier 217,818 (2.27%) Decrease 1.74%
2014 None None Decrease 2.27%
2018 None None Steady

State Controller[edit]

Year State Controller nominee Votes Change
1994 Cullene Marie Lang 128,378 (1.56%) Steady
1998 Pamela Pescosolido 147,397 (1.84%) Decrease 0.28%
2002 None None Decrease 1.84%
2006 Donna Tello 188,934 (2.26%) Increase 2.26%
2010 Andrew Favor 291,657 (3.03%) Increase 0.77%
2014 None None Decrease 3.03%
2018 None None Steady

Insurance Commissioner[edit]

Year Insurance Commissioner nominee Votes Change
1994 Ted Brown 346,007 (4.21%) Steady
1998 Dale Ogden 169,922 (2.11%) Decrease 2.10%
2002 Dale Ogden 236,688 (3.29%) Increase 1.18%
2006 Dale Ogden 305,772 (3.67%) Increase 0.38%
2010 Richard Bronstein 362,037 (3.95%) Increase 0.28%
2014 None None Decrease 3.95%
2018 None None Steady

State Assembly[edit]

Year Number of candidates Votes Change
1992 46 343,366 (3.29%) Steady
1994 35 166,510 (2.08%) Decrease 1.21%
1996 26 142,577 (1.54%) Decrease 0.54%
1998 38 144,427 (1.85%) Increase 0.31%
2000 52 316,668 (2.83%) Decrease 0.98%
2002 36 162,472 (2.35%) Decrease 0.48%
2004 34 324,414 (2.85%) Increase 0.30%
2006 21 122,036 (1.51%) Decrease 1.34%
2008 15 171,324 (1.43%) Decrease 0.08%
2010 18 115,714 (1.23%) Decrease 0.20%
2012 0 0 (0.00%) Decrease 1.23%
2014 1 30,735 (0.41%) Increase 0.41%
2016 4 130,798 (1.01%) Increase 0.60%
2018 5 145,514 (1.23%) Increase 0.22%

Voter registration[edit]

Libertarian voter registration in the state of California has experienced significant growth.[25]

Year Registered voters Voter gain or loss from previous year
2017 141,461 Increase 1,656
2016 139,805 Increase 17,929
2015 121,876 Increase 1,072
2014 120,804 Increase 11,168
2013 109,636 Increase 900
2012 108,736 Increase 16,490
2011 92,246 Increase 1,135
2010 91,111 Increase 7,748
2009 83,363 Decrease 211
2008 83,574 Increase 154
2007 83,420 Decrease 45
2006 83,465 Decrease 503
2005 83,968 Decrease 5,649
2004 89,617 Increase 77
2003 89,540 Decrease 955
2002 90,495 Decrease 2,865
2001 93,360 Decrease 1,540
2000 94,900 Increase 12,561
1999 82,339

Governance[edit]

The Libertarian Party of California is a "political party that has detailed statutory provisions applicable to its operation", which are in division 7, part 3 of the California Elections Code.[26][27] The Libertarian State Central Committee, the governing body of the Libertarian Party of California, functions pursuant to its standing rules and bylaws.[28] The regular officers of the Central Committee are the chairman, two regional vice chairmen, secretary, and treasurer.

County central committees[edit]

There are semi-autonomous county central committees for many of California's 58 counties. The counties which currently have active affiliates are as follows:

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Combined
  2. ^ Ran as independent.
  3. ^ Combined
  4. ^ Combined

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rothbard, Murray Newton (1978). For a New Liberty: The Libertarian Manifesto. p. 153. Even more remarkably, the Libertarian party achieved this growth while consistently adhering to a new ideological creed—"libertarianism"—thus bringing to the American political scene for the first time in a century a party interested in principle rather than in merely gaining jobs and money at the public trough.
  2. ^ "Libertarian Party opposes further intervention in Iraq". June 18, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c d "Ideological Third Parties and Splinter Parties". June 3, 2017.
  4. ^ "Elected Officials - Libertarian Party". LP.org. Retrieved December 17, 2017.
  5. ^ "Home - Libertarian Party of California". Libertarian Party of California. Retrieved March 20, 2018.
  6. ^ "Voter Registration Statistics - California Secretary of State". www.SOS.ca.gov. Retrieved March 20, 2018.
  7. ^ "LPC Lawsuit". The Californian. October 14, 1972. p. 4. Archived from the original on December 9, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ "Libertarian runs for state governor". Oakdale Leader. February 22, 1978. p. 6. Archived from the original on December 9, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ "Liberatarians in appeal for spot on ballot". The San Francisco Examiner. March 15, 1979. p. 42. Archived from the original on December 9, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "Libertarian Jeff Hewitt Wins Seat on Riverside County Board of Supervisors". December 7, 2018.
  11. ^ "The San Diego Union-Tribune - San Diego, California & National News". www.SanDiegoUnionTribune.com. Retrieved December 17, 2017.
  12. ^ "Voters choose incumbent Noble, candidates Fowler and Emberland for rec district board". Chicoer.com. March 10, 2006. Retrieved December 17, 2017.
  13. ^ "Tulare County Office of Education - School Districts". www.TCOE.org. Retrieved December 17, 2017.
  14. ^ "Lucia Mar: Early results show Martin, Millis and Dahl winning school board seats". SanLuisObispo.com. Retrieved December 17, 2017.
  15. ^ "Councilwoman-elect Susan Marie Weber: Fourth Time's the Charm". Patch.com. December 5, 2012. Retrieved December 17, 2017.
  16. ^ "Brian Holtz, Candidate for Purissima Hills Water District". Patch.com. August 25, 2012. Retrieved December 17, 2017.
  17. ^ "Simi Valley Acorn". Simi Valley Acorn. Retrieved December 17, 2017.
  18. ^ "Election 2015: Voters return Harrington to San Gabriel City Council". PasadenaStarNews.com. March 4, 2015. Retrieved December 17, 2017.
  19. ^ "Jack Hickey seeks a different seat on the Sequoia Healthcare District board than the one he already has". MercuryNews.com. August 22, 2012. Retrieved December 17, 2017.
  20. ^ "Board of Directors - Tehachapi-Cummings County Water District". TCCWD.com. Retrieved December 17, 2017.
  21. ^ "Special District Roster". SonomaCounty.ca.gov. Retrieved December 17, 2017.
  22. ^ http://old.lp.org/candidates/elected-official/john-camera
  23. ^ "California Libertarian Activist Vol. III Issue 1 (04-29-2017) - Libertarian Party of California". LP.org. June 11, 2017. Retrieved December 17, 2017.
  24. ^ "Hewitt voted in as Calimesa's new mayor". NewsMirror.net. Retrieved December 17, 2017.
  25. ^ "Voter Registration Statistics - California Secretary of State". www.SOS.ca.gov. Retrieved December 17, 2017.
  26. ^ Eu v. San Francisco County Democratic Central Committee (1989), 489 U.S. 214 Archived March 12, 2014, at the Wayback Machine. "The State of California heavily regulates its political parties. … The California Elections Code (Code) provides that the 'official governing bodies' for such a party are its 'state convention,' 'state central committee,' and 'county central committees,' …"
  27. ^ California Elections Code § 7250
  28. ^ "[1]". Bylaws and Convention Rules of the Libertarian Party of California As Amended in Convention April 29, 2017.

External links[edit]