Journal of Biomolecular NMR

Journal of Biomolecular NMR  
Journal of Biomolecular NMR.jpg
DisciplineNuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy
LanguageEnglish
Edited byGerhard Wagner
Publication details
History1991-present
Publisher
FrequencyMonthly
2.319 (2018)
Standard abbreviations
ISO 4J. Biomol. NMR
Indexing
ISSN0925-2738 (print)
1573-5001 (web)
Links

The Journal of Biomolecular NMR publishes research on technical developments and innovative applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for the study of structure and dynamic properties of biopolymers in solution, liquid crystals, solids and mixed environments. Some of the main topics include experimental and computational approaches for the determination of three-dimensional structures of proteins and nucleic acids, advancements in the automated analysis of NMR spectra, and new methods to probe and interpret molecular motions.

The journal was founded in 1991 by Kurt Wüthrich, who later received a Nobel prize in Chemistry in 2002 for his seminal contributions to the field of NMR[1]. Now, the current editor-in-chief is Gerhard Wagner (Harvard Medical School).[2]

According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2017 impact factor of 2.534, ranking it 174th out of 292 journals in the category "Biochemistry & Molecular Biology"[3] and 15th out of 42 journals in the category "Spectroscopy".[4]

Associate Editors[edit]

Accompanying Gerhard Wagner (editor-in-chief), the Associate Editors of the Journal of Biomolecular NMR are: Ad Bax (NIH, USA), Martin Billeter (Göteborg University, Sweden), Lewis E. Kay (University of Toronto, Canada), Rob Kaptein (Utrecht University, The Netherlands), Gottfried Otting (Australian National University, Australia), Arthur G. Palmer (Columbia University, USA), Tatyana Polenova (University of Delaware, USA), and Bernd Reif (TU Munich, Germany)

Most cited articles[edit]

According to the Web of Science, as of August 2018, there are seven Journal of Biomolecular NMR articles with over 1,500 citations:

  1. Delaglio, F.; Grzesiek, S.; Vuister, G.W.; Zhu, G.; Pfeifer, J.; Bax, A. (1995). "NMRPipe: A multidimensional spectral processing system based on UNIX pipes". Journal of Biomolecular NMR. 6 (3): 277–293. doi:10.1007/BF00197809.cited 9,252 times.
  2. Laskowski, R.A.; Rullmann, J.C.; MacArthur, M.W.; Kaptein, R.; Thornton, J.M. (1996). "AQUA and PROCHECK-NMR: Programs for checking the quality of protein structures solved by NMR". Journal of Biomolecular NMR. 8 (4): 477–486. doi:10.1007/BF00228148.cited 3,527 times.
  3. Piotto, M.; Saudek, V.; Sklenář, V. (1992). "Gradient-tailored excitation for single-quantum NMR spectroscopy of aqueous solutions". Journal of Biomolecular NMR. 2 (6): 661–665. doi:10.1007/BF02192855.cited 3,199 times.
  4. Cornilescu, G.; Delaglio, F.; Bax, A. (1999). "Protein backbone angle restraints from searching a database for chemical shift and sequence homology". Journal of Biomolecular NMR. 13 (3): 289–302. doi:10.1023/A:1008392405740.cited 2,540 times.
  5. Johnson, B.A.; Blevins, R.A. (1994). "NMR View: A computer program for the visualization and analysis of NMR data". Journal of Biomolecular NMR. 4 (5): 603–614. doi:10.1007/BF00404272.cited 2,288 times.
  6. Wishart, D.S.; Bigam, C.G.; Yao, J.; Abildgaard, F; Dyson, J.; Oldfield, E.; Markley, J.L.; Sykes, B.D. (1995). "1H, 13C and 15N chemical shift referencing in biomolecular NMR". Journal of Biomolecular NMR. 6 (2): 135–140. doi:10.1007/BF00211777.cited 1,781 times.
  7. Wishart, D.S.; Sykes, B.D. (1994). "The 13C Chemical-Shift Index: A simple method for the identification of protein secondary structure using 13C chemical-shift data". Journal of Biomolecular NMR. 4 (2): 171–180. doi:10.1007/BF00175245.cited 1,723 times.


References[edit]

  1. ^ JBNMR webpage
  2. ^ JBNMR editorial board
  3. ^ "Journals Ranked by Impact: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology". 2017 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Sciences ed.). Thomson Reuters. 2018.
  4. ^ "Journals Ranked by Impact: Spectroscopy". 2017 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Sciences ed.). Thomson Reuters. 2018.

External links[edit]