Israel F. Fischer

Israel F. Fischer
Israel F. Fischer.jpeg
Presiding Judge of the United States Customs Court
In office
1927–1932
Preceded byWilliam Barberie Howell
Succeeded byGeorge M. Young
Judge of the United States Customs Court
In office
May 28, 1926 – March 31, 1932
Appointed byoperation of law
Preceded bySeat established by 44 Stat. 669
Succeeded byFrederick W. Dallinger
President of the Board of General Appraisers
In office
1902–1905
Preceded byCharles H. Ham
Succeeded byMarion De Vries
Member of the Board of General Appraisers
In office
May 9, 1899 – May 28, 1926
Appointed byWilliam McKinley
Preceded byFerdinand N. Shurtleff
Succeeded bySeat abolished
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 4th district
In office
March 4, 1895 – March 3, 1899
Preceded byWilliam J. Coombs
Succeeded byBertram Tracy Clayton
Personal details
Born
Israel Frederick Fischer

(1858-08-17)August 17, 1858
New York City, New York
DiedMarch 16, 1940(1940-03-16) (aged 81)
New York City, New York
Resting placeMaimonides Cemetery
Brooklyn, New York
Political partyRepublican
Educationread law

Israel Frederick Fischer (August 17, 1858 – March 16, 1940) was a United States Representative from New York, a Judge and Presiding Judge of the United States Customs Court and a member and President of the Board of General Appraisers.

Education and career[edit]

Born on August 17, 1858, in New York City, New York,[1] Fischer attended the public schools and Cooper Institute (now Cooper Union) in New York City and moved to Brooklyn, New York in September 1887.[2] He was employed as a clerk in a law office, where he read law and was admitted to the bar in 1879.[2] He entered private practice in New York City from 1880 to 1895.[1] He was a member of the executive committee of the Republican state committee from 1888 to 1890.[2]

Congressional service[edit]

Fischer was elected as a Republican from New York's 4th congressional district to the United States House of Representatives of the 54th and 55th United States Congresses, serving from March 4, 1895, to March 3, 1899.[2] He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1898 to the 56th United States Congress.[2]

Federal judicial service[edit]

Fischer received a recess appointment from President William McKinley on May 2, 1899, to a seat on the Board of General Appraisers vacated by member Ferdinand N. Shurtleff.[1] He was nominated to the same position by President McKinley on December 15, 1899.[1] He was confirmed by the United States Senate on January 17, 1900, and received his commission on January 22, 1900.[1] He served as President from 1902 to 1905.[1] Fischer was reassigned by operation of law to the United States Customs Court on May 28, 1926, to a new Associate Justice seat (Judge from June 17, 1930) authorized by 44 Stat. 669.[1] He served as Chief Justice (Presiding Judge from June 17, 1930) from 1927 to 1932.[1] His service terminated on March 31, 1932, due to his retirement.[1] He was succeeded by Judge Frederick W. Dallinger.[1]

Other service and death[edit]

Fischer was a delegate to the International Customs Congress held in New York City in 1903.[2] He died on March 16, 1940, in New York City.[1] He was interred in Maimonides Cemetery in Brooklyn.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Sources[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov.

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
William J. Coombs
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 4th congressional district

1895–1899
Succeeded by
Bertram Tracy Clayton
Legal offices
Preceded by
Ferdinand N. Shurtleff
Member of the Board of General Appraisers
1899–1926
Succeeded by
Seat abolished
Preceded by
Charles H. Ham
President of the Board of General Appraisers
1902–1905
Succeeded by
Marion De Vries
Preceded by
Seat established by 44 Stat. 669
Judge of the United States Customs Court
1926–1932
Succeeded by
Frederick W. Dallinger
Preceded by
William Barberie Howell
Presiding Judge of the United States Customs Court
1927–1932
Succeeded by
George M. Young