Guató language

Guató
Native toBrazil
RegionMato Grosso do Sul state: Paraguay River banks and up São Lourenço River, along Bolivian border;[1] also Uberaba Lake[2]
Ethnicity370 Guató people (2008)[1]
Native speakers
5 (2011)[1]
Language codes
ISO 639-3gta
Glottologguat1253[3]
Guato language.png
This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.

Guató is a possible language isolate spoken by 1% of the Guató people of Brazil. Kaufman (1990) provisionally classified it as a branch of the Macro-Jê languages, but no evidence for this was found by Eduardo Ribeiro.

In Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, it is spoken on the banks of the Paraguay River and up the São Lourenço River, along the Bolivian border.[4] In Bolivia, it is spoken at Uberaba Lake.[2]

Phonology[edit]

The Guato vowel system, like that of Macro-Jê languages, collapses a three-way distinction of height in oral vowels to two in nasal vowels.[5]

Oral Nasal
Front Central Back Front Central Back
Close i ɨ u ĩ ɨ̃ ũ
Mid e o ã
Open ɛ a ɔ
Labial Denti-
alveolar
Post-
alveolar
Velar Labio-
velar
Glottal
Nasal m n
Plosive voiced b d ɡ ɡʷ
voiceless p t k
Fricative f h
Sonorant w ɾ j

Vocabulary[edit]

Loukotka (1968) lists the following basic vocabulary items for Guató.[2]

gloss Guató
one chenéhe
two dúni
three chumó
tooth makuá
tongue mundokuír
hand mara
woman muazya
water mágũ
fire matá
moon múpina
maize madzyéro
jaguar mépago
house movír

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Guató at Ethnologue (19th ed., 2016)
  2. ^ a b c Loukotka, Čestmír (1968). Classification of South American Indian languages. Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center.
  3. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Guató". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  4. ^ Eberhard, David M.; Simons, Gary F.; Fennig, Charles D., eds. (2019). "Brazil languages". Ethnologue: Languages of the World (22nd ed.). Dallas: SIL International.
  5. ^ A. P. Palacios, 1984; A. V. Postigo, 2009
  • Alain Fabre, 2005, Diccionario etnolingüístico y guía bibliográfica de los pueblos indígenas sudamericanos: GUATÓ.[1]