2010 Oakland mayoral election

2010 Oakland mayoral election
Flag of Oakland, California.svg
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  Jean Quan at Lake Merritt during her Campaign for Mayor (1).jpg 3x4.svg Rebecca Kaplan in July 2010 (1).jpg
Candidate Jean Quan Don Perata Rebecca Kaplan
Party Nonpartisan Nonpartisan Nonpartisan
First round vote 29,266 40,342 15,808
First round percentage 24.47% 33.73% 15.52%
Final round vote 53,897 51,872 Eliminated
Final round percentage 50.96% 49,04% Eliminated

 
Candidate Joe Tuman
Party Nonpartisan
First round vote 14,347
First round percentage 12.00%
Final round vote Eliminated
Final round percentage Eliminated

Mayor before election

Ron Dellums
Democratic

Elected Mayor

Jean Quan
Democratic

The 2010 Oakland mayoral election was held on November 2, 2010 to elect the mayor of Oakland, California. It saw the election of Jean Quan.

The election was held using instant-runoff voting. It was the first Oakland election run using this system.[1]

In early August 2010, incumbent mayor Ron Dellums announced that he would not be seeking reelection to a second term.[2]

Candidates[edit]

Results[edit]

Results summary[edit]

The following table shows a summary of the instant runoff for the election. The table shows the round in which the candidate was defeated or elected the winner, the votes for the candidate in that round, and what share those votes were of all votes counting for any candidate in that round. There is also a bar graph showing those votes for each candidate and categorized as either first-round votes or votes that were transferred from another candidate.

Oakland mayoral election, 2010[10]
Party Candidate Maximum
Round
Maximum
Votes
Share in
Maximum
Round
Maximum Votes
First Round VotesTransfer Votes
Nonpartisan Jean Quan 10 53,897 50.96%
Nonpartisan Don Perata 10 51,872 49.04%
Nonpartisan Rebecca Kaplan 9 32,719 28.90%
Nonpartisan Joe Tuman 8 15,462 13.24%
Nonpartisan Marcie Hodge 7 3,625 3.07%
Nonpartisan Terence Candell 6 2,680 2.26%
Nonpartisan Don MacLeay 5 1,852 1.56%
Nonpartisan Greg Harland 4 1,087 0.91%
Nonpartisan Larry Lionel "LL" Young Jr. 3 976 0.82%
Nonpartisan Arnold Fields 2 738 0.62%
Nonpartisan Write-ins 1 268 0.22%

Vote counts by round[edit]

The following table shows how votes were counted[10] in a series of rounds of instant runoffs. Each voter could mark which candidates were the voter's first, second, and third choice. Each voter had one vote, but could mark three choices for how that vote can be counted. In each round, the vote is counted for the most preferred candidate that has not yet been eliminated. Then one or more candidates with the fewest votes are eliminated. Votes that counted for an eliminated candidate are transferred to the voter's next most preferred candidate that has not yet been eliminated.

Candidate Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round 4 Round 5 Round 6 Round 7 Round 8 Round 9 Round 10
Jean Quan 29,266 29,299 29,391 29,514 29,645 30,500 30,884 31,655 35,033 53,897
Don Perata 40,342 40,374 40,455 40,606 40,728 40,814 41,364 42,188 45,465 51,872
Rebecca Kaplan 25,813 25,831 25,890 26,026 26,117 26,496 26,831 27,475 32,719
Joe Tuman 14,347 14,357 14,471 14,552 14,780 14,949 15,202 15,462
Marcie Hodge 2,994 2,999 3,033 3,155 3,200 3,250 3,625
Terence Candell 2,315 2,316 2,386 2,497 2,613 2,680
Don MacLeay 1,630 1,636 1,677 1,719 1,852
Greg Harland 966 968 1,059 1,087
Larry Lionel "LL" Young Jr. 933 939 976
Arnold Fields 733 738
Write-in 268
Continuing votes 119,607 119,457 119,338 119,156 118,935 118,689 117,906 116,780 113,217 105,769
Exhausted ballots 0 149 262 435 376 893 1,655 2,766 6,284 13,667
Over Votes 355 356 362 371 376 380 401 416 461 526
Under Votes 2,306 2,306 2,306 2,306 2,306 2,306 2,306 2,306 2,306 2,306
Total 122,268 122,268 122,268 122,268 122,268 122,268 122,268 122,268 122,268 122,268

Continuing votes are votes that counted for a candidate in that round. Exhausted ballots represent votes that could not be transferred because a less preferred candidate was not marked on the ballot. Voters were allowed to mark only three choices because of voting system limitations. Over votes are votes that could not be counted for a candidate because more than one candidate was marked for a choice that was ready to be counted. Under votes are ballots were left blank or that only marked a choice for a write-in candidate that had not qualified as a write-in candidate.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Final Results in Oakland's First RCV Election". FairVote. December 16, 2010. Retrieved December 12, 2019.
  2. ^ Kuruvila, Matthai (August 5, 2010). "Oakland Mayor Dellums won't run for re-election". The San Francisco Chronicle.
  3. ^ Alyssa, Fetini (May 1, 2016). "Terence Candell fights for role as mayor". Oakland North. Retrieved December 9, 2019.
  4. ^ Trautman, Ted (October 26, 2010). "Small business owner Arnie Fields aims for top Oakland job". Oakland North. Retrieved December 9, 2019.
  5. ^ Lau, Shirley (October 22, 2010). "Political novice Greg Harland stakes claim on mayoral seat". Oakland North. Retrieved December 9, 2019.
  6. ^ "Marcie Hodge". Ballotpedia. Retrieved December 8, 2019.
  7. ^ Elmusa, Karmah (October 21, 2010). "Mayoral candidate Don Macleay sells voters on going 'Green'". Oakland North. Retrieved December 9, 2019.
  8. ^ Hautala, Laura (September 28, 2010). "From political commentator to mayoral candidate, Joe Tuman is a familiar voice in Oakland". Oakland North. Retrieved December 8, 2019.
  9. ^ Pennington, Whitney (October 25, 2010). "Oakland's youngest mayoral candidate, Larry Lionel Young, Jr., strives to stand out". Oakland North. Retrieved December 9, 2019.
  10. ^ a b "RCV Results Report" (PDF). acvote.org. Alameda County.