2004 United States elections

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2004 United States elections
Presidential election year
Election dayNovember 2
Incumbent presidentGeorge W. Bush (Republican)
Next Congress109th
Presidential election
Partisan controlRepublican Hold
Popular vote marginRepublican +2.4%
Electoral vote
George W. Bush (R)286
John Kerry (D)251
2004 United States presidential election in California2004 United States presidential election in Oregon2004 United States presidential election in Washington (state)2004 United States presidential election in Idaho2004 United States presidential election in Nevada2004 United States presidential election in Utah2004 United States presidential election in Arizona2004 United States presidential election in Montana2004 United States presidential election in Wyoming2004 United States presidential election in Colorado2004 United States presidential election in New Mexico2004 United States presidential election in North Dakota2004 United States presidential election in South Dakota2004 United States presidential election in Nebraska2004 United States presidential election in Kansas2004 United States presidential election in Oklahoma2004 United States presidential election in Texas2004 United States presidential election in Minnesota2004 United States presidential election in Iowa2004 United States presidential election in Missouri2004 United States presidential election in Arkansas2004 United States presidential election in Louisiana2004 United States presidential election in Wisconsin2004 United States presidential election in Illinois2004 United States presidential election in Michigan2004 United States presidential election in Indiana2004 United States presidential election in Ohio2004 United States presidential election in Kentucky2004 United States presidential election in Tennessee2004 United States presidential election in Mississippi2004 United States presidential election in Alabama2004 United States presidential election in Georgia2004 United States presidential election in Florida2004 United States presidential election in South Carolina2004 United States presidential election in North Carolina2004 United States presidential election in Virginia2004 United States presidential election in West Virginia2004 United States presidential election in the District of Columbia2004 United States presidential election in Maryland2004 United States presidential election in Delaware2004 United States presidential election in Pennsylvania2004 United States presidential election in New Jersey2004 United States presidential election in New York2004 United States presidential election in Connecticut2004 United States presidential election in Rhode Island2004 United States presidential election in Vermont2004 United States presidential election in New Hampshire2004 United States presidential election in Maine2004 United States presidential election in Massachusetts2004 United States presidential election in Hawaii2004 United States presidential election in Alaska2004 United States presidential election in the District of Columbia2004 United States presidential election in Maryland2004 United States presidential election in Delaware2004 United States presidential election in New Jersey2004 United States presidential election in Connecticut2004 United States presidential election in Rhode Island2004 United States presidential election in Massachusetts2004 United States presidential election in Vermont2004 United States presidential election in New HampshireElectoralCollege2004.svg
About this image
2004 Presidential election results map. Red denotes states/districts won by Republican George W. Bush, and Blue denotes those won by Democrat John Kerry. Numbers indicate electoral votes allotted to the winner of each state.
Senate elections
Overall controlRepublican Hold
Seats contested34 of 100 seats
Net seat changeRepublican +4
2004 Senate election results map
2004 Senate election results map
House elections
Overall controlRepublican Hold
Popular vote marginRepublican +2.6%
Net seat changeRepublican +3
2004 House election results map
2004 House election results map
Gubernatorial elections
Seats contested13 (11 states, 2 territories)
Net seat changeNone
2004 Gubernatorial election results map
2004 Gubernatorial election results map
Territorial races not shown
Legend
  Democratic hold
  Democratic gain
  Republican hold
  Republican gain
  Independent hold

The 2004 United States elections were held on November 2, with President George W. Bush winning re-election. Riding Bush's coattails, the Republicans picked up net gains of 4 Senate seats and 3 House seats, increasing their majorities in both Houses of Congress. In the state governorships up for election, there was no net gain in seats for either party. Foreign policy was the dominant theme throughout the election campaign, particularly Bush's conduct of the War on Terrorism and the 2003 invasion of Iraq.[1]

Federal[edit]

President[edit]

Republican incumbent President George W. Bush was re-elected, defeating Democratic Senator John Kerry from Massachusetts.

Candidate Votes % States led National ECV
Republican George W. Bush 62,040,610 50.73 31 286
Democrat John Kerry 59,028,444 48.27 19+DC 251
Independent Ralph Nader 465,650 0.38 - -
Libertarian Michael Badnarik 397,265 0.32 - -
Constitution Michael Peroutka 143,630 0.12 - -
Green David Cobb 119,859 0.096 - -
Peace and Freedom Leonard Peltier 27,607 0.023 - -
Socialist Walt Brown 10,837 0.009 - -
Socialist Workers Roger Calero, James Harris 10,800 0.009 - -
None of these candidates (Nevada) 3,688 0.003 - -
Thomas Harens 2,387 0.002 - -
Prohibition Gene Amondson 1,944 0.002 - -
Bill Van Auken 1,857 0.002 - -
Workers World John Parker 1,646 0.001 - -
Charles Jay 946 0.001 - -
Stanford Andress 804 0.001 - -
Prohibition Earl Dodge 140 0.000 - -
Democrat John Edwards - - - 1
Total 122,267,553 100.000 50 + DC 538

United States Congress[edit]

United States House of Representatives[edit]

Republicans gained a couple of seats in the House, mainly due to the 2003 Texas redistricting.

e • d Summary of the 2004 United States House of Representatives elections results
Parties Seats Popular Vote
2002 2004 Net
Change
Strength Vote % Change
  Republican Party 229 232 Increase 3 53.3% 55,958,144 49.4% -0.6%
  Democratic Party 205 202 Decrease 3 46.4% 52,969,786 46.8% +1.6%
  Libertarian Party 1,056,844 0.9% -0.5%
  Independent 1 1 0 0.2% 674,202 0.6% +0.1%
  Green Party 344,549 0.3% -0.1%
  Constitution Party 187,006 0.2% -
  Reform Party 85,539 0.1% +0.1%
  Independence Party 76,053 0.1% +0.1%
  Conservative Party 51,529 <0.1% -0.1%
  Peace and Freedom Party 29,684 <0.1% -
  Peace and Justice Party 20,106 <0.1% -
  Socialist Equality Party 8,586 <0.1% -
  Personal Choice Party 7,806 <0.1% -
  Marijuana Party 4,914 <0.1% -
  Healthcare Party 3,285 <0.1% -
  Working Families Party 3,196 <0.1% -
  Liberty Union Party 3,018 <0.1% -
  Socialist Workers Party 2,976 <0.1% -
  Help Residents Party 2,399 <0.1% -
  Natural Law Party 2,153 <0.1% -
  Jobs Equality Business Party 1,993 <0.1% -
  Immigration Moratorium Now Party 1,746 <0.1% -
  Centrist Party 1,353 <0.1% -
  Pro Life Conservative Party 1,282 <0.1% -
  Fair Party 1,248 <0.1% -
  Socialist Party 1,169 <0.1% -
  Politicians are Crooks Party 1,066 <0.1% -
  E Pluribus Unum Party 931 <0.1% -
  Randolph for Congress Party 857 <0.1% -
  Others 1,688,866 1.5% -0.5%
Total 434 435 0 100.0% 113,192,286 100.0%
Source: Election Statistics - Office of the Clerk

United States Senate[edit]

The 34 seats in the United States Senate Class 3 were up for election. Republicans had a net gain of 4 seats.

Summary of the United States Senate elections, 2004 results [edit]

Parties Total
Democratic Republican Independent Libertarian Others
Before these elections 48 51 1 100
End of this Congress (two months later) 48 51 1 100
Not Up 29 36 1 66
Up 19 15 34
Incumbent
retired
Held by same party 1 1
Replaced by other party Decrease 2 Republicans
replaced by
Increase 2 Democrats
Decrease 5 Democrats
replaced by
Increase 5 Republicans
IncreaseDecrease 7
Incumbent
ran
Won re-election 13 12 25
Lost re-election Decrease 1 Democrat
replaced by
Increase 1 Republican
IncreaseDecrease 1
Lost renomination, held by same party 0
Lost renomination, and party lost 0
Total held 13 13 26
Total not held / gained Decrease 2 Increase 4 IncreaseDecrease 6
Total elected 15 19 34
Result 44 55 1 100
Popular
vote
Votes 44,754,618 39,920,562 186,231 754,861 2,481,075 88,097,347
Share 50.8% 45.3% 0.21% 0.86% 2.82% 100%

Sources:

State[edit]

Governors[edit]

Eleven of the fifty United States governors were up for re-election, as were the governorships of two U.S. territories. The final results were a net change of zero between the political parties. The Democrats picked up the governorships in Montana and New Hampshire, but the Republicans picked up the ones in Indiana and Missouri.

Other state-wide Officer elections[edit]

In many states where if the following positions were elective offices, voters cast votes for candidates for state executive branch offices of Lieutenant Governor (though some were voted for on the same ticket as the gubernatorial nominee), Secretary of state, state Treasurer, state Auditor, state Attorney General, state Superintendent of Education, Commissioners of Insurance, Agriculture or, Labor, etc.) and state judicial branch offices (seats on state Supreme Courts and, in some states, state appellate courts).

State Legislative elections[edit]

Many states across the nation held elections for their state legislatures.[2]

Initiatives and Referenda[edit]

Vote for same-sex marriage ban by counties:
  90% – 100%
  80% – 90%
  70% – 80%
  60% – 70%
  50% – 60%
Vote against same-sex marriage ban by counties:
  60% – 70%
  50% – 60%

Local elections[edit]

Mayoral elections[edit]

Some of the major American cities that held their mayoral elections in 2004 included:

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Statistics of the Presidential and Congressional Election of November 2, 2004" (PDF). U.S. House of Reps, Office of the Clerk. Retrieved 10 April 2017.
  2. ^ "2004 Presidential Election". The American Presidency Project. Retrieved 10 April 2017.
  3. ^ (365Gay)
  4. ^ >Armstrong, Kevin (2008-01-10). "Chesapeake mayor Dalton Edge won't run for second term". The Virginian-Pilot.
  5. ^ Dillon, Jeff (2005-04-25). "San Diego mayor announces departure less than 5 months into second term". San Diego Union-Tribune.

Further reading[edit]

  • Ceaser, James W. and Andrew E. Busch. Red Over Blue: The 2004 Elections and American Politics (2005), narrative history.
  • Greene, John C. and Mark J. Rozell, eds. The Values Campaign?: The Christian Right and the 2004 Elections (2006).
  • Sabato, Larry J. Divided States of America: The Slash And Burn Politics of the 2004 Presidential Election (2005).
  • Stempel III, Guido H. and Thomas K. Hargrove, eds. The 21st-Century Voter: Who Votes, How They Vote, and Why They Vote (2 vol. 2015).

External links[edit]