Check mark

Check mark
heavy check mark ballot box with check white heavy check mark
Punctuation
apostrophe  '
brackets [ ]  ( )  { }  ⟨ ⟩
colon :
comma ,  ،  
dash ‒  –  —  ―
ellipsis  ...  . . .      
exclamation mark !
full stop, period .
guillemets ‹ ›  « »
hyphen
hyphen-minus -
question mark ?
quotation marks ‘ ’  “ ”  ' '  " "
semicolon ;
slash, stroke, solidus /    
Word dividers
interpunct ·
space     
General typography
ampersand &
asterisk *
at sign @
backslash \
basis point
bullet
caret ^
dagger † ‡ ⹋
degree °
ditto mark ” 〃
equals sign =
inverted exclamation mark ¡
inverted question mark ¿
komejirushi, kome, reference mark
multiplication sign ×
number sign, pound, hash #
numero sign
obelus ÷
ordinal indicator º ª
percent, per mil % ‰
pilcrow
plus, minus + −
plus-minus, minus-plus ± ∓
prime    
section sign §
tilde ~
underscore, understrike _
vertical bar, pipe, broken bar |    ¦
Intellectual property
copyright ©
copyleft 🄯
sound-recording copyright
registered trademark ®
service mark
trademark
Currency
currency sign ¤

؋฿¢$֏ƒ£元 圆 圓 ¥

Uncommon typography
asterism
fleuron, hedera
index, fist
interrobang
irony punctuation
lozenge
tie
Related
In other scripts

A check mark, checkmark or tick is a mark (✓, ✔, etc.) used (primarily in the English speaking world) to indicate the concept "yes" (e.g. "yes; this has been verified", "yes; that is the correct answer", "yes; this has been completed", or "yes; this [item or option] applies to me"). The x mark is also sometimes used for this purpose (most notably on election ballot papers, e.g. in the United Kingdom), but otherwise usually indicates "no", incorrectness, or failure.

As a verb, to check (off) or tick (off), means to add such a mark. Printed forms, printed documents, and computer software (see checkbox), commonly include squares in which to place check marks.

International differences[edit]

The check mark is a predominant affirmative symbol of convenience in the English-speaking world because of its instant and simple composition. In other countries, however, the mark is more complicated.

It is common in Swedish schools for a to indicate that an answer is incorrect, while "R", from the Swedish rätt, i.e., "correct", is used to indicate that an answer is correct.[1]

In Finnish, ✓ stands for väärin, i.e., "wrong", due to its similarity to a slanted v. The opposite, "correct", is marked with , a slanted vertical line emphasized with two dots.[2]

In Japan and Korea, the O mark (marujirushi) is used instead of the check mark, and the X or ✓ mark are commonly used for wrong.

In the Netherlands a 'V' is used to show that things are missing while the flourish of approval (or krul) is used for approving a section or sum.

In Britain, the check mark is commonly called a tick.

Unicode[edit]

The "Symbol, Other" category of Unicode provides various check marks:

  • U+237B NOT CHECK MARK
  • U+2611 BALLOT BOX WITH CHECK
  • U+2705 WHITE HEAVY CHECK MARK
  • U+2713 CHECK MARK
  • U+2714 HEAVY CHECK MARK
  • U+1F5F8 🗸 LIGHT CHECK MARK
  • U+1F5F9 🗹 BALLOT BOX WITH BOLD CHECK

History[edit]

The check mark is believed[by whom?] to have been created during the Roman Empire. "V" was used to shorten the word "veritas", meaning 'truth'. This was used to indicate yes, true, or confirmed on items in a list. Over time, the design of the mark changed. As people wrote more quickly, the right side became elongated.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]